39,000-Year-Old Cave Bear Thawed Out of Permafrost in Siberia is Perfectly Preserved

According to researchers there is currently a 39,000-year-old cave bear that recently thawed out from permafrost in Sibiria. Archeologists in Russia find two fully intact bears inside an ice wall in two separate digs, according to sources. Russian scientists have already identified this discovery as ‘worldly significant,’ as cave bears were found just before these bones. First, the frozen bodies were noticed by the herds of rain. Cave bears were extinct or sub-species that lived in Eurasia between three and five thousand years ago. There was a mother and a child in the well preserved skeletons. For tens of thousands of years, the soft tissue of the adult cave bear has been frozen in its permafrost tomb. The scientists are hopeful that the extinct animal’s DNA is identified. They still intend to get the legendary woolly mammoth back to life.

Scientists of Russia’s North-Eastern Federal University (NEFU) in Yakutsk will be studying the bodies of the cave bears. Global research practitioners will be eligible to participate in the North Applied Ecology Institute study. It is estimated that, from 22,000 to 35,500 years earlier, the adult bear existed. The observations have been accepted by the experts. They are considered a significant step in the rediscovery and return of the endangered animals of the Ice Age by Russian scientists.

According to a Prehistoric wildlife archive reports, the cellar bear Ursus Spelaeus is by far one of the most common mammals in the fossil record in Pleistocene, and the German army was also used as a phosphate source during the First World War. The bear of the canyon, Ursus Speläus and U, are at least two extinct species. Deningeri, renowned for its tradition of inhabiting groves and also stored its bones. During the Pleistocene cave deposits of more than 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago, numerous fossils of skulls and bones were found.

Ana Fischer

Ana Fischer is the acting CEO and executive director of the commercial USA Association of the States Pharmaceutical Industry. She has been registered with the General Dental Council for three years as a dental care professional and has worked in a variety of clinical roles as well as her current academic position, some examples are within community, private and mixed practice.

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